Cotswolds Public Toilets: Locations, Charges, and Accessibility (2023)

The Cotswolds is a region in southwestern England that is known for its picturesque countryside, charming towns and villages, and rich cultural heritage.

Visitors to the area can explore historic sites, sample delicious local cuisine, and enjoy the region’s natural beauty, including rolling hills and meandering rivers.

While cuisine, landmarks, and culture get a lot of attention, knowing where public toilets are often gets overlooked.

There are only 15 public toilets throughout the Cotswolds but finding these can be a challenge, especially for first-time visitors.

Take note that, in most cases, there is a 40p charge to access with the public toilets in Chipping Campden and Lechlade being free.

Whether you call it the loo, toilet, washroom, bathroom, restroom, or lavatory, this Travel Cotswolds public toilet guide covers locations, charges, accessibility and general tips.

Cotswold Public Toilets At A Glance

Cotswolds Public ToiletsChargeSummer Opening TimesWinter Opening TimesAccessibilityBaby Changing Facilities
Bibury, The Street
GL7 5NP
40p8am – 8pm8am – 6pmYesYes
Bourton on the Water, Church Rooms GL54 2AX40p8am – 6pm8am – 6pmYesYes
Bourton on the Water, Rissington Road GL54 2DR40p8am – 8pm8am – 6pmYesYes
Chipping Campden, Sheep Street
GL55 6DX
Free8am – 7pm8am – 6pmYesYes
Cirencester, The Brewery Car Park
GL7 1JH
40p8am – 8pm8am – 6pmYesYes
Cirencester, Forum Car Park
GL7 2PF
40p8am – 7pm8am – 6pmYesYes
Cirencester, London Road
GL7 1AB
40p7am – 8pm8am – 6pmYesYes
Fairford, High Street
GL7 4AF
40p8am – 8pm8am – 6pmYesYes
Lechlade, Burford Street
GL7 3AJ
Free8am – 7pm8am – 6pmYesYes
Moreton in Marsh, High Street
GL56 0AH
40p6am – 8pm6am – 6pmYesYes
Northleach, Market Place
GL54 3EJ
Free9am – 5pm9am – 5pmYesNo
Stow-on-the-Wold, Market Square,
GL54 1AB
40p8am – 8pm8am – 6pmYesYes
Stow-on-the-Wold, Maugersbury Road Car Park GL54 1HH40p8am – 8pm8am – 6pmYesYes
Tetbury, The Chipping
GL8 8ES
Free8am – 7pm8am – 6pmYesNo
Tetbury, West Street
GL8 8LL
Free8am – 7pm8am – 6pmYesYes
Updated July 2023
Original source: Cotswold Council

Restroom and Washroom Difference

Here’s a rundown of words and terms used to describe toilets in England because different countries use different terminology for this purpose.

LavatoryA room equipped with a toilet and sink for washing and used interchangeably with washroom or restroom. The ‘lav’, and ‘lavvy’ are slang for lavatory.
BathroomA room equipped with a bathtub or shower, and facilities for washing and possibly a toilet.
RestroomA place designed to provide a place for people to rest, relax, or refresh themselves. Restrooms may also have toilets.
ToiletA fixture or facility used for the disposal of human waste and found in homes, public and private buildings, petrol stations, and outdoor spaces. This is the most used word for public or any toilet in the UK.
WCAn abbreviation for water closet and originating from the 19th century when indoor plumbing became more common, and toilets were equipped with a flushing mechanism that used water.
BogSlang. Originally referred to an open cesspit and was later applied to indoor sanitation facilities.
LooCommonly used as in ‘Where’s the loo?’, ‘I need to go to the loo’.

Accessibility/Baby Changing Facilities

Many public toilets in the Cotswolds have accessibility access with facilities such as handrails, wide doors, and emergency alarms.

Baby changing facilities are also available in many public toilets, making it easier for families with young children to travel in the area.

Cotswolds Public Toilets (Villages)

Bibury
Bibury is a small village located in the eastern part of the Cotswolds and known for its picturesque Arlington Row featuring a row of historic cottages that date back to the 17th century.

The public toilet in Bibury is located on The Street (postcode GL7 5NP) and is open from 8am to 8pm in the summer and from 8am to 6pm in the winter. The toilet is accessible and has baby changing facilities.

Bourton-on-the-Water
Bourton-on-the-Water is a picturesque village in the heart of the Cotswolds. The village is known for its beautiful bridges that span the River Windrush and its Model Village.

There are two public toilets in Bourton-on-the-Water. The first is in the Church Rooms (postcode GL54 2AX) and is open from 8am to 6pm year-round.

The second is located on Rissington Road (postcode GL54 2DR) and is open from 8am to 8pm in the summer and from 8am to 6pm in the winter. Both toilets are accessible and there are baby changing facilities.

Chipping Campden
Chipping Campden is a charming village in the northern part of the Cotswolds and known for its well-preserved limestone buildings and historic Market Hall.

There are two public toilets in Chipping Campden.

One is operated by Cotswold District Council and is on the High Street and there is a 40p entry charge. Opening times are from 8am to 8pm in the summer and from 8am to 6pm in the winter and is accessible, and has baby changing facilities.

The other is operated by National Trails and is on Sheep Street. This is free to use and open from 8am to 7pm in the summer and from 8am to 6pm in the winter. The toilet is also accessible and has baby changing facilities.

Cirencester
This a market town is in the southern part of the Cotswolds and known for its historic buildings and is a popular destination for visitors to the area.

There are three public toilets in Cirencester, all of which charge 40p for entry. The first is in The Brewery Car Park and is open from 8am to 8pm in the summer and from 8am to 6pm in the winter.

The second is in Forum Car Park and is open from 8am to 7pm year-round. The third is located on London Road and is open from 7am to 8pm in the summer and from 8am to 6pm in the winter.

All three toilets are accessible and has baby changing facilities.

Fairford
Fairford is a small town in Gloucestershire, England. The town is known for its historic church, which features several impressive stained glass windows.

The public toilet in Fairford is on High Street (postcode GL7 4AF) and is open from 8am to 8pm in the summer and from 8 to 6pm in the winter and has both accessible and baby changing facilities.

Lechlade

Lechlade is home to the famous 19th century Halfpenny Bridge, and a popular with tourists for its picturesque riverfront. The beautiful 15th century Church of St. Lawrence is another must see.

The public toilet is on Burford Street and is free to use and open from 8am to 7pm in the summer and from 8am to 6pm in the winter and has accessibility and baby changing facilities.

Moreton-in-Marsh
Moreton-in-Marsh is a market town in the northern part of Gloucestershire, England and known for its historic buildings and is a popular destination for visitors to the Cotswolds.

The public toilet is on High Street and charges 40p for entry and open from 6am to 8pm in the summer and from 6am to 6pm in the winter. The toilet is accessible and has baby changing facilities.

Northleach
Northleach is a small town in Gloucestershire, England. The town is known for its historic marketplace and is a popular destination for visitors to the Cotswolds.

The public toilet in Northleach is in Market Place and is free to use and open from 9am to 5pm year-round. The toilet is accessible but does not have baby changing facilities.

Stow-on-the-Wold
Stow-on-the-Wold is a market town located in the northern part of Gloucestershire, England. The town is known for its historic buildings and is a popular destination for visitors to the Cotswolds.

Cotswolds public toilets - Stow-on-the-Wold's are in this building
There’s a public toilet inside this building at Stow-on-the-Wold’s Market Square

There are two public toilets in Stow-on-the-Wold.

One can be found in Market Square and charges 40p for entry. The toilet is open from 8am to 8pm in the summer and from 8am to 6pm in the winter. The toilet is accessible and has baby changing facilities.

The other is in Maugersbury Road Car Park and charges 40p for entry with the same opening times, accessibility and baby changing facilities as the first one.

Tetbury
Explore the charming history of Tetbury – a small town in the southern Cotswolds famous for its historic architecture. Once a prosperous wool town in the 16th and 17th centuries, this picturesque destination is home to buildings that date back to that time.

There are two public toilets in Tetbury, both of which are free to use. The first is on The Chipping and is open from 8am to 7pm in the summer and from 8am to 6pm in the winter with accessibility but is without baby changing facilities.

The second public toilet is located on West Street and is open from 8am to 7pm in the summer and from 8am to 6pm in the winter, with accessibility and has baby changing facilities.

RADAR Key Gives Free Access

A RADAR key gives free access to public toilets for the disabled
RADAR Key

An NKS key, commonly known as a RADAR key, is a two-toned, blue, and silver key that gives free access to over 10,000 accessible toilets in the UK.

Created by the National Key Scheme (NKS), this innovative tool allows access to locked accessible toilets without having to ask for assistance.

Access to these facilities is regardless of whether the person has a visible or non-visible disability.

These keys can be purchased from various outlets, including the Cirencester Visitor Information Centre, which is at the Corinium Museum on Park Street in Cirencester.

While some accessible toilets may be opened without a RADAR key, having one can provide greater flexibility and access to a wider range of facilities.

Keep Spare Change

Most public toilets in the Cotswolds require coins for entry, so it’s important to make sure you have some on hand.

While some toilets may have a change machine available, it’s best to come prepared with the correct amount of coins to avoid any issues. Most machines will not give change nor accept credit/debit cards.

You need to feed Cotswolds public toilets with coins. English coins are 1 pence (commonly referred to as ‘p’ as in 1p), 2 pence, 5 pence, 10 pence, 20 pence, 50 pence, 1 pound and 2 pound. There are 100 pence to the pound (£/GBP).

Coin machines often only accept 5p, 10p, 20p, 50p, £1, and £2 coins and may not give change. All coins are round apart from the 20 pence and 50 pence coins which are 7-sided. If you want to see what they look like, check out The Royal Mint’s website.

Toilet Etiquette

When using Cotswolds public toilets, it’s important to follow proper bathroom etiquette to ensure that the facilities remain clean and hygienic for other visitors. Some important tips to keep in mind include:

– Use toilet paper sparingly and dispose of it down the toilet.

– Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after using the toilet.

– Use a paper towel or tissue to open and close doors and dispose of it properly in the provided bin.

– Avoid flushing anything other than toilet paper down the toilet, as this can cause blockages.

– Check to see if there is toilet paper available. If not, ask a nearby shop or restaurant if they have any available or if you can use their toilet instead.

Remember to follow proper bathroom etiquette, bring coins for entry, and plan to ensure a comfortable and stress-free trip. If you discover a leaky pipe, slippery floor, or the soap has run out, for example, there is usually a number to call posted on the door or nearby.

Reduced Hours In Winter

Cotswolds public toilets may be closed or have reduced hours during the winter months.

This is especially true for toilets in more remote areas or those that are in outdoor spaces. It’s always a good idea to check ahead of time to ensure that the facilities you plan to use will be open during your visit.

While most public toilets are well-maintained and clean, it’s always a good idea to bring hand sanitizer or disinfectant wipes with you, especially during times of heightened concern over hygiene and cleanliness.

Unfortunately, although rare, some public toilets may be damaged because of vandalism. The local authorities typically work hard to repair and reopen facilities as quickly as possible.

It’s always a good idea to check ahead of time to ensure that the facilities you plan to use will be available during your visit, especially if you are visiting a more remote area.

No Public Toilet? Options

While there are public toilets available in some towns in the Cotswolds, there may be occasions where you cannot find one nearby.

Cafes, pubs, restaurants, or shops may allow you to use their facilities, but it is important to ask permission before using these facilities.

In summary, whether you’re a local or a visitor to the area, this guide provides useful information for finding and using Cotswolds public toilets.

By understanding the different terms used to describe public toilets in England, knowing where to find accessible and baby changing facilities, and bringing coins for entry, you can have a comfortable and stress-free trip.

Remember to check ahead for any closures or reduced hours during the winter months, and to treat public facilities with respect to ensure that they remain open and available for everyone to use.

Frequently Asked Questions

Are public toilets free in the UK?

Public toilets in the UK are not always free. While some public toilets may be free, others may require a fee for use. For example, many public toilets are located in parks and require an entry fee of 20p or more. Additionally, some local councils provide free public toilets while others charge a fee.

Are public restrooms required by law in the UK?

Public restrooms are not required by law in the UK. However, many cities and towns have adopted a Community Toilet Scheme which provides free public toilets in certain locations.

What are public toilets called in England?

Public toilets in England are called toilets. It is common also to hear people ask for directions to the lavatory if inside a building. The lav, lavvy, loo, and slang words such as bog, throne room, little boys/girls room, powder room are also common.

Do cafes and restaurants need to provide toilets?

If seating is provided for people to eat and drink, public toilets and hand washing facilities must also be provided for those customers to use.

How do you use a public toilet in the UK?

English toilets are designed for sitting while urinals are for standing. There are usually separate cubicles for men and women, but in some cases they may be shared. Be sure to check the toilet signs before using any facility. Wash and dry your hands afterwards.

Do you flush toilet paper in the UK?

Yes. Toilets in the UK are robust enough to accept paper flushed down the toilet.

What not to flush down the toilet in the UK?

Wet wipes, disposable diapers, sanitary items and other bulky objects should never be flushed down the toilet. It’s best to put these items into a bin or bag and put them in the regular trash bin.

Enchantment Awaits
Enchantment Awaits

The Cotswolds region is home to many charming villages and towns, churches, historic landmarks, outdoor activities, in a beautiful part of England. After visiting the region many times, we created the TravelCotswolds.com website dedicated to helping others plan their own trips to the Cotswolds.

Contact: hello@travelcotswolds.com

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